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Simon Levasseur

 

Master student

Department of Applied Geomatics, Université de Sherbrooke

2500, boul. de l'Université
Université de Sherbrooke
Quebec, Canada
J1K 2R1

819.821.7686
Simon.Levasseur@USherbrooke.ca

 

 


 

Direction

 
 

Research project

Quantification of snowmelt and runoff and the impact on isotope influx in the arctic marine environment: Investigation using the SNOWPACK model

In Canada, watershed hydrology and stream hydraulics are strongly influenced by spring snowmelt. Snow water equivalent must be estimated with the highest possible precision, in particular to improve water resources management and mitigation of associated natural hazards. For arctic regions, where hydrology is mostly driven by snowmelt, predictions of runoff may lead to a better understanding of several phenomena such as isotope transportation within snow cover.
My project is under the umbrella of the multi-scale cryosphere monitoring network for the Kitikmeot region and the Northwest Territories developed at the Université de Sherbrooke. The network uses in-situ measurements, modeling and remote sensing. The aim is to understand the distribution of isotopic chemical elements in the snow cover to monitor their transport and the temporal trends during melting snow runoff. Using the SNOWPACK modeling platform, the main objective is to quantify snow depth, water equivalent and the associated runoff. With this information, isotope measurements will be conducted to quantify their influx in the marine environment. Two study sites will be used for measurement and sampling campaigns. They are located in the Greiner basin near Cambridge Bay (Nunavut) and Daring Lake (Northwest Territories).
The project is supervised by members of the Canada Centre for Inland Waters and Fisheries and Oceans Canada, specialists in hydrology and geochemical processes. Collaboration with the University of British Columbia will allow the geochemical measurements while providing a better understanding of polar oceans in the global climate system.

 
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